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VIDEO: COALITION for a COMMISSION


Dear Members,

Here is the official video from The Coalition for a Commission's rally in front of the White House on November 16th, 2015:

http://sol-reform.com/2015/11/join-us-in-asking-president-obama-to-establish-a-national-commission-on-child-sex-abuse/

Our media editor extraordinaire, Courtney Soliday, has done a wonderful job putting it together, and we're looking forward to hearing your feedback. Please take a look and share on your social media outlets, as well as with fellow organizations and individuals. We want to get this out there, spread awareness, and push for an official federal commission!

Thank you all for the help and support. Please feel free to let me know if you have any questions or concerns.

In Solidarity,
Zoe

http://sol-reform.com/


Zoe Kheyman
Juris Doctor Candidate, Class of 2016
Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law
(347) 416-3176


The Voices Behind Angelina Jolie


6/18/13

DNA: Analysis - The Voices Behind Angelina Jolie

http://www.dnaindia.com/

The Voices Behind Angelina Jolie

DNA / Naomi Wolf / Sunday, June 9, 2013 11:51 IST

On May 26, Angelina Jolie’s aunt, Debbie Martin, died of breast cancer at 61. Jolie’s mother, Marcheline Bertrand, died at 56 from a related illness, ovarian cancer. And, two weeks before Martin died, Jolie revealed that she had undergone a preventive double mastectomy after testing positive for a BRCA gene mutation - which is correlated with a woman’s being five times more susceptible to breast cancer and 28 times more susceptible to ovarian cancer.

The test for the BRCA mutation is expensive - roughly $3,500. In the United States, health insurers cover the cost only if a first-degree relative — for example, a woman’s mother — has had a history of breast or ovarian cancer;; other women must pay out of pocket. Given the benefits of preventive care, the test has become highly controversial, because its manufacturer, Myriad Genetics, holds a genetic patent that gives it a monopoly — and huge profits — on all testing.

Her revelation of her mastectomy— and the evident support of her partner, Brad Pitt — has elicited a rapturous response from popular media, including the tabloids that once damned her as the “other woman” who broke up Pitt’s previous marriage. There is something about the narrative — a sex symbol sacrificing her fetishised breasts for the sake of her children, with her husband staying by her side — that is deeply reassuring to women in Western culture.

But the real importance of Jolie’s story is its context: a wave of women and men, in very different settings around the world, who are insisting on narrating their own meanings for events involving their bodies — events that, like breast cancer, were once shrouded in shame, silence, fear, or blame. Jolie has refused to treat mastectomy as scary or tragic — or as making her “less of a woman” in any way.She is thus modelling a refusal to be a woman victim;; by doing so, she is also modelling agency in relation to her own body and its “story.”

Jolie is prominent, but she is hardly alone. Consider the Brazilian women who are coming forward to talk publicly about having been raped on public buses — attacks that echo similar assaults in India and Egypt. Or consider the two young female staffers of New York officials who have publicly pressed their complaints about having been sexually harassed by New York Assemblyman Vito J Lopez.

Similarly, the men who were sexually abused in the 1970’s at Horace Mann, a prestigious New York City private school, are refusing to perpetuate the silence and “shame” of their victimisation by a circle of pedophiles (and by the school officials who covered up the abusers’ behavior). They have now joined a highly publicised lawsuit against the school, stepping into the light of day under their own names.

Times have surely changed — partly because of people and actions like these.

Twenty-two years ago, when Anita Hill publicly accused then-US Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas of sexual harassment, it was she, the alleged victim, who was scrutinised and smeared as “a little bit nutty and a little bit slutty.”

When I began in recent years to insist that the traditional silence and anonymity assigned to rape victims does not protect them, but only perpetuates a Victorian framework in which rapists attack with impunity and victims are asked to carry the “shame,” my argument was met with hostility. But events are proving me right: nothing changes until everything changes — that is, until a critical mass of “victims” comes forward under their own names to reject the shame assigned to them for carrying a scary, “mutilating” disease, for having been assaulted by rapists, or for having been abused by pedophiles.

Angelina Jolie puts a famous face on this phenomenon. But many others are already standing up and proclaiming, under their own names and bylines: “I have a right to say publicly what happened to me, and to define it in my own terms;; it is not my disgrace.”

Naomi Wolfis a political activist and social critic whose most recent book is Give Me Liberty: A HandbookFor AmericanRevolutionaries. Copyright: Project Syndicate, 2013.

www.project-syndicate.org


URL of the article: http://www.dnaindia.com/analysis/column_the-voices-behind-angelina-jolie_1845656-all

© 2005-2013 Diligent Media Corporation Ltd. All rights reserved.

 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE: Detention of Critic of Child Abuse Draws Ire in China


 
JUNE 7, 2013, 2:19 AM Detention of Critic of Child Abuse Draws Ire in China By DIDI KIRSTEN TATLOW BEIJING — The first urgent message came at 11.41 in the morning of Thursday, May 30: Ye Haiyan, a campaigner against child abuse and for the rights of sex workers and those with HIV/AIDS, wrote that her home had been invaded and she was being physically attacked in Bobai, Guangxi Province.



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE: Detention of Critic of Child Abuse Draws Ire in China


 
JUNE 7, 2013, 2:19 AM Detention of Critic of Child Abuse Draws Ire in China By DIDI KIRSTEN TATLOW BEIJING — The first urgent message came at 11.41 in the morning of Thursday, May 30: Ye Haiyan, a campaigner against child abuse and for the rights of sex workers and those with HIV/AIDS, wrote that her home had been invaded and she was being physically attacked in Bobai, Guangxi Province.



Bill Irwin's Recap of August 16th Alumni Council Meeting


Recap of the Alumni Council meeting with Steve Friedman and Tom Kelly on August 16th:
Justin Lerer, President of the Alumni Council kicked it off by announcing that this meeting is not confidential, and in fact, by then end he encouraged all of us to communicate to our fellow alumni what transpired at the meeting, hence my [Facebook] post here.



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